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The Days Of Weinsteins and Roses

Jon Allison

Jon Allison’s Monday Blog

From Roger Ailes to Bill O’Reilly to Harvey Weinstein to Roy Moore to Al Franken, sexual harassment and other inappropriate and, in some cases, criminal conduct (see Harvey Weinstein/Rose McGowan among others) has been all over the news and more and more victims have felt empowered to come forward and report it. In the employment context, it is important for employees to understand their rights and how to exercise those rights. What is appropriate in the workplace? What constitutes harassment under the law and/or under relevant workplace policies? What are the options for reporting the conduct? What reasonably can be expected from the employer following a report of sexual harassment or some other form of harassment/discrimination? Will the employer retaliate and, if so, what can be done about it? These continue to be hard questions. If you are unsure of how to handle what might be harassment in the workplace and you don’t feel comfortable reporting it internally to Human Resources or a supervisor, you should make an appointment with an employment attorney and get some advice.

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