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Monday Blog

Jon Allison

Food for Thought
Nearly 40% of sexual harassment claims filed with the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission come from the restaurant industry.  A majority of servers are female and because they rely on tips for most of their pay, they report being less willing to challenge harassment from male customers.  A number of states have raised the minimum wage paid to tipped workers making them less reliant on tips for their pay.  According to Restaurant Opportunities Centers United, in those states sexual harassment by customers, co-workers and managers is less prevalent.  For more details, read this article.

Only 64th worst
Three managers at the former Airbus Alliance LLC in Miami were ranked 64th on eBoss Watch’s list of America’s 100 worst bosses.  According to a whistleblowing Human Resources manager, the three racist managers told her that giving an African-American a job application would be a “waste of paper.”  Applications from African-Americans were thrown in the trash and the company hired no African-Americans over a four-year period.  When the human resources manager complained about the racist practices, she was fired.  Still, 63 bosses ranked higher on eBoss Watch’s list.  Get more information here.

How much evidence do you need to show discrimination?
Last week the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit overturned a lower court’s decision and found direct evidence of race discrimination when a casino waitress in Louisiana wasn’t promoted to a managerial position.  The plaintiff in the case presented evidence from her former manager that the decision maker said he would not permit “a dark skinned black person” to handle money at the casino and said several times that the plaintiff was “too black to do various tasks at the casino.”  The lower court had earlier found this wasn’t enough evidence to show discrimination.

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