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Historical Hire In NFL

Jon Allison

Jon Allison’s Monday Blog

Tom Brady and Peyton Manning are historical figures in the NFL and the game yesterday was another good one. Last week though, a woman made history in the NFL. Kathryn Smith became the first woman to hold a full-time coaching position in the NFL. The Buffalo Bills hired her as a special teams coach. Smith began her NFL career as an intern with the New York Jets in 2003. She has spent the last 7 years working with Bills and former Jets head coach Rex Ryan. Ryan said Smith “deserves this promotion based on her knowledge and strong commitment.” Women broke into the full-time coaching ranks in the NBA in 2014.

Kathryn Smith Makes History As NFL’s First Female Full-Time Coach

 

Failing To Identify Gifted African-American Students

In previous weeks I’ve written about various social-science research studies. Here’s another one. A recent national study found that African-American students are put on a gifted track at a much lower rate than white students who have comparable test scores. The researchers in this study looked only at schools with gifted programs so their findings can’t be accounted for by where kids go to school. The researchers found one factor that eliminated the disparity in being identified as gifted – whether the teacher was African-American. The study found that teachers who are not African-American identify African-American students as gifted in reading 2.1 percent of the time compared to 6.2 percent of the time for white students. African-American teachers identify African-American and white students as gifted at the same rate – 6.2 percent of the time. The researchers say that they can’t tell from their study what is causing the disparity. Further study is needed.

To Be Young, ‘Gifted’ And Black, It Helps To Have A Black Teacher

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Social Media Profiles And Muslim Job Applicants

Jon Allison

Jon Allison’s Monday Blog

Two researchers at Carnegie Mellon University recently conducted a study on the use of social media in hiring decisions and found a negative impact on those belonging to the Muslim faith.

The researchers created Facebook profiles for fictional job applicants making them similar in almost every way with the exception of information indicating religious affiliation. The fictional individuals were either Christian or Muslim. The researchers then sent out applications to more than 4,000 employers. There was no indication of religion affiliation in the application materials. The employers had to search the social media profiles of the applicants to obtain that information.

According to the study approximately 33% of employers looked at the applicants’ social media profiles. In more politically conservative areas of the country there was a significant difference in offers for an interview between Christian and Muslim applicants. In the 10 most politically conservative states, 17% of Christian applicants received offers for interviews compared to 2% of Muslim candidates.

Notably, the researchers also looked for any differences in the interview offer rate between gay and straight individuals and found no statistically significant difference.

Discrimination on the basis of religion in hiring decisions is illegal. Studies, including this one, show that it happens. Employers need to be challenged on their hiring practices. Job applicants should be aware of their social media profiles and the fact that prospective employers may look at those profiles before making hiring decisions. If you think you’ve been the victim of discrimination, you should consult a lawyer.

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New Study Shows Age Discrimination Has Greater Impact On Female Applicants

Jon Allison

Jon Allison’s Monday Blog
I blogged about age discrimination a couple of times last month.  Last week, the Washington Post reported that a new study shows age discrimination in hiring has a greater impact on women than men.  The study is probably the largest field experiment ever testing age discrimination in the hiring process.  According to the study, resumes of older women get far fewer callbacks than those of older men as well as all younger applicants.  The researchers sent out over 40,000 resumes.  The researchers studied different job categories, including administrative, sales, janitorial and security.  Overall, the study showed a strong bias against hiring older workers.  But the researchers observed that when they focused in on older female applicants, there was greater disparity.  For example, for administrative jobs, female applicants 49 to 51 years of age got 29 percent fewer callbacks than those age 29 to 31.  Applicants age 64 to 66 got 47 percent fewer callbacks.  Similar results were found for sales jobs.  The researchers note that women tend to live longer on average than men and therefore may benefit from staying in the workforce longer than men.  This won’t help.

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The Growing Problem of Age Discrimination

Jon Allison

Jon Allison’s Monday Blog
A couple of weeks ago I wrote about college professors and their reluctance to retire.  They are, of course, in the position of being able to choose to stay on because those who have tenure can’t be terminated unless there is cause to do so.  Even Professor Marcy, the Astronomer who resigned after pressure from colleagues following a sexual harassment investigation, wasn’t fired.
The majority of us do not have the job security of college professors and many older workers are experiencing age discrimination.  Take the example of Leslye Evans-Lane.  She left her teaching job in New Mexico when she was 58 because she and her husband were moving to Oregon.  She assumed that with her extensive experience she’d find work.  Instead, it took 2 years to find a part-time teaching gig.  Then, after six months on the job, the position became full-time and she was terminated and replaced with a younger teacher.  She wasn’t even interviewed for the full-time position.
According to AARP two-thirds of workers age 45 to 74 say they have experienced or witnessed age discrimination.  It’s not likely to get better.  There are a lot of baby boomers and people are living longer.  Many older workers are reluctant to retire due in part to concerns over having enough in savings to last as well as simply wanting to work.  Employers on the other hand have concerns about job performance decreasing with age, although research does not support those concerns.  It’s also less expensive to employ younger workers.  This article goes in to more detail.

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UC Berkeley Buries Harassment: Colleagues Force Professor Out

Jon Allison

Jon Allison’s Monday Blog

Astronomer Geoffrey Marcy, a leader in the search for life on other planets, resigned last week from the University of California, Berkeley, following an investigation into sexual harassment allegations. However, he was not asked to resign by the University. Far from it. The University had conducted a six-month investigation of Marcy’s conduct and determined that Marcy had routinely violated the University’s sexual harassment policies over a 10 year period. Marcy was found to have engaged in unwelcome kissing, groping, and massages of at least 4 students over the years. The University wanted to keep it quiet. After wrapping up the investigation in June, rather than discipline Marcy, the University told him to be on his best behavior or he might be disciplined in the future.

After learning of the findings months later, faculty at Berkeley were concerned that the University was sending a message that there were no consequences for such conduct and that the University’s handling of the situation would encourage rather than discourage similar behavior from others. 24 faculty members in the department of astronomy signed off on a letter saying they did not believe Marcy could continue to perform his job as a faculty member. A couple of days later, Marcy resigned. Marcy was the head of a $100 million dollar project searching for evidence of life on other planets and was considered a possible candidate for the Nobel Prize.

Does UC Berkeley Astronomer Marcy’s Downfall Signal Shift in Attitudes Over Sexual Harassment?

Did UC Berkeley Turn a Blind Eye to Harassment?

Geoffrey Marcy’s Berkeley Astronomy Colleagues Call for His Dismissal

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