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Free Pete Company Declares Victory

Randy Freking

After 26 years of the “Free Pete” campaign, we are pleased that the Cincinnati Reds and Major League Baseball announced on Tuesday that Pete Rose will be inducted into the Cincinnati Reds Hall of Fame. According to Mr. Rose, the Reds’ Hall of Fame has always been his first choice, and we agree. The Free Pete Company is declaring victory and will no longer need to sell “Free Pete” merchandise.  

 As with any workplace issue, even the most serious, a 26 year sentence is simply beyond any reasonable form of punishment. As Mr. Rose commented, “I’ve never murdered a soul.”  

 

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Physical Attractiveness And Class Performance

Jon Allison

Your looks influence the grades you receive, unless you take an online course.  Those are the findings of researchers at Metropolitan State University of Denver.  They looked at records of tens of thousands of college students.  They grouped the students by ACT scores and then compared their grades and their physical attractiveness which was rated by looking at student ID cards.  They found that the women rated least attractive received significantly lower grades than their peers.  The women rated most attractive received higher grades and male teachers were more likely than female teachers to give higher grades to better looking female students. However, when these same students took online courses the grade disparity disappeared.  There are numerous studies that show there are advantages to being good looking in various aspects of life, including in employment.  This study serves as yet another reminder that people need to be mindful of their own internal biases and how those biases impact their views and their decision
making.   This nprEd post goes in to more detail.

 

 

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Social Media Profiles And Muslim Job Applicants

Jon Allison

Jon Allison’s Monday Blog

Two researchers at Carnegie Mellon University recently conducted a study on the use of social media in hiring decisions and found a negative impact on those belonging to the Muslim faith.

The researchers created Facebook profiles for fictional job applicants making them similar in almost every way with the exception of information indicating religious affiliation. The fictional individuals were either Christian or Muslim. The researchers then sent out applications to more than 4,000 employers. There was no indication of religion affiliation in the application materials. The employers had to search the social media profiles of the applicants to obtain that information.

According to the study approximately 33% of employers looked at the applicants’ social media profiles. In more politically conservative areas of the country there was a significant difference in offers for an interview between Christian and Muslim applicants. In the 10 most politically conservative states, 17% of Christian applicants received offers for interviews compared to 2% of Muslim candidates.

Notably, the researchers also looked for any differences in the interview offer rate between gay and straight individuals and found no statistically significant difference.

Discrimination on the basis of religion in hiring decisions is illegal. Studies, including this one, show that it happens. Employers need to be challenged on their hiring practices. Job applicants should be aware of their social media profiles and the fact that prospective employers may look at those profiles before making hiring decisions. If you think you’ve been the victim of discrimination, you should consult a lawyer.

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FMR Proposes Dalton Street Post Office Be Renamed

Randy Freking

Freking Myers & Reul proposes that the Dalton Street Post Office should be renamed.  If the Bengals win tomorrow night our suggestion would be “McCarron Drive Post Office”.   Who Dey!!photo 3

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Pennsylvania Court Strikes Down Law Banning Employment Due To Criminal Record

Jon Allison

Jon Allison’s Monday Blog

Last week, just before the New Year, the Commonwealth Court in Pennsylvania found unconstitutional a law that banned those convicted of crimes from ever working at nursing homes or long-term-care facilities. The Older Adults Protective Services Act specifically prevented anyone who had been convicted of any crime, no matter how long ago, from ever being employed full-time at a nursing home or long-term-care facility. The Court unanimously ruled that the law violated the due process rights of law abiding citizens who had been in trouble in many cases several decades earlier. Plaintiffs in the lawsuit had convictions between 15 and 35 years prior for drug possession, writing bad checks, disorderly conduct, assault and theft. All of them had clean records since their convictions. Many had, in addition to being prevented from finding work, been fired from multiple jobs due to their criminal records.  Find more information in this NPR article.

 

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