Cincinnati (513) 721-1975 (map)
Dayton (937) 228-3731 (map)
Denver (303) 357-2355 (map)

Fines For Failing To Post Notices About Illegal Discrimination Increased

Jon Allison

Jon Allison’s Monday Blog

The Equal Employment Opportunity Commission is increasing the fine for failing to post required Federal nondiscrimination notices to $525 per violation starting July 5, 2016. Every employer that is covered by Federal discrimination laws is required to post notices in prominent and accessible places where notices to employees and applicants are typically maintained describing the Federal laws prohibiting job discrimination based on race, color, sex, national origin, religion, age, equal pay, disability and genetic information. The current fine per violation is $210. Despite the fine, employers continue to violate the posting requirements. 2010 saw the highest number of violations in the last 10 years. Employees who are unsure of their rights should be able to locate and review these notices. If your employer has not complied with the posting requirements, speak up.

EEOC Doubles Fine for Poster Violation – HRWatchdog

Share

The Bathroom Videotapes

Jon Allison

Jon Allison’s Monday Blog

Last week Achiote’s, a Mexican Restaurant located in Southern California, settled a sexual harassment suit brought by the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission involving a manager secretly using his cell phone to videotape male workers going to the bathroom. The victims of the videotaping complained. One called the San Diego police. An Assistant Manager with Achiote’s was charged with disturbing the peace in connection with the videotaping of his coworkers in the bathroom. However, according to the lawsuit, the restaurant retaliated against those who complained by cutting their hours. The lawsuit followed. Retaliation against employees who have complained of sexual harassment is illegal. If you believe you’re experiencing harassment at work, talk to an employment attorney about your rights.

Restaurant Settles EEOC Suit Over Secret Bathroom Videos …

Waiter Reports Secret Bathroom Camera, EEOC Sues …

Share

UPS Hit With $5.3 Million Dollar Verdict In Hostile Work Environment Case

Jon Allison

Jon Allison’s Monday Blog

Last Thursday a Fayette County, Kentucky jury awarded eight African-American men $5.3 million dollars in a hostile work environment case against UPS. The plaintiffs worked for UPS in Lexington, Kentucky. At trial, evidence was presented that the plaintiffs were routinely subjected to racist comments, including the n-word, jungle bunny and porch monkey. Evidence was presented that an effigy of an African-American UPS driver was hung from the ceiling for four days. The men went to Human Resources several times to complain but things did not improve. Instead, for some, things got worse. The jury found that UPS retaliated against 2 drivers who complained by having managers conduct extended “ride alongs” as a subtle form of intimidation. The lawsuit was filed in 2014. Trial began April 4, 2016. The jury deliberated about 8 hours before rendering the verdict against UPS.

Kentucky jury awards $5.3M in UPS discrimination lawsuit …

Lexington UPS Employees Awarded $5.3 Million In Damages

Share

Mississippi Makes Discrimination Against LGBT Persons The Law In The Hospitality State

Jon Allison

Jon Allison’s Monday Blog

Last Tuesday Mississippi Governor Phil Bryant signed into law a bill permitting businesses, individuals and religious organizations to deny goods and services to LGBT persons if providing such goods and services would offend “sincerely held religious beliefs.” The law takes effect July 1, 2016. This move by the state prevents cities and towns from putting in place anti-discrimination protections for LGBT persons. There has been widespread criticism of the law. The Mississippi Economic Council, the ACLU and numerous other organizations have announced their opposition to the law. Elected officials in various parts of the country have banned non-essential state travel to Mississippi. Bryan Adams cancelled a concert. Some of the state’s largest employers, including MGM Resorts, Toyota, Nissan, and Tyson Foods have denounced the law. More than a dozen corporations, including Coca-Cola, GE and Whole Foods have joined with the Human Rights Campaign in calling for repeal of the law. Similar bills have been proposed and discussed in a number of states and localities, but the threat of losing business has often shut discussions down. We’ll see how this plays out.

Mississippi OKs religious freedom bill decried as anti-LGBT …

Mississippi governor signs law allowing businesses to …

States, Cities Limit Official Travel To Mississippi Over … – NPR

Why Mississippi’s New Anti-LGBT Law Is the Most …

Share

First Lawsuits Asserting Sexual Orientation Discrimination Filed By EEOC

Jon Allison

Jon Allison’s Monday Blog
Earlier this month, the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission filed the first two lawsuits it has ever filed taking the position that sexual orientation discrimination is covered under Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. The suits were filed in the U.S. District Court for the Western District of Pennsylvania and the U.S. District Court for the District of Maryland, Baltimore Division.
In EEOC v. Scott Medical Health Center, the EEOC is alleging that a gay male employee was subjected to harassment because of his sexual orientation when his manager repeatedly referred to him using a number of anti-gay epithets and made offensive comments about his sexuality and sex life. When the employee complained to a supervisor the supervisor said the harasser was just doing his job. The supervisor refused to take any action to stop the harassment. After weeks of harassment, the employee resigned.
In EEOC v IFCO systems, the EEOC is alleging that a lesbian employee was harassed by her boss because of her sexual orientation. The employee’s boss made numerous offensive comments and sexually suggestive gestures. The employee complained to management and called the employee hotline. Days later she was fired.
Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 prohibits discrimination because of sex. As the federal law enforcement agency charged with interpreting Title VII, the EEOC has concluded that harassment and other discrimination because of sexual orientation is prohibited sex discrimination. We’ll see how these lawsuits play out.
EEOC Files First Suits Challenging Sexual Orientation …

Share